Hindu Cosmos

Hindu Cosmology – Many Paths to One God

Hindus believe that the world is created, destroyed, and re-created in an eternally repetitive series of cycles.

In Hindu cosmology a universe endures for about 4,320,000,000 years (one day of Brahma or kalpa) and is then destroyed by fire or water. At his point, Brahma rests for one night, just as long as the day. This process, named pralaya, repeats for such 100 years, period that represents Brahma’s lifespan.

After Brahma’s “death”, it is necessary that another 100 of his years pass until he is reborn and the whole creation begins anew. This process is repeated again and again, forever.

Brahma’s life is divided in one thousand cycles (Maha Yuga, or the Great Year). Maha Yuga, during which the human race appears and then disappears, has 71 divisions, each made of 14 Manvantara (1000) years. Each Maha Yuga lasts for 4,320,000 years. Manvantara is Manu’s cycle, the one who gives birth and govern human race.

Each Maha Yuga consists of a series of four shorter yugas, or ages. The yugas get progressively worse from a moral point of view as one proceeds from one yuga to another. As a result each yuga is of shorter duration than the age that preceded it.

Yuga

Duration (years)God

Virtue

Satya Yuga1,728,000BrahmaMeditation
Treta Yuga1,296,000VishnuKnowledge
Dvapara Yuga864,000VishnuSacrifice
Kali Yuga432,000Vishnu Shiva-RudraCharity
4,320,000

Krit or Satya Yuga

Krit Yuga is the first yuga of a Maha Yuga. This is the age of virtue and moral perfection. It is a bright, golden age on earth. The great god Vishnu, in his form of Brahma, the creator of the world, is the presiding god, and dharma (ideal, righteous behavior or moral duty) walks steadily and securely upon all four feet.

The Satya Yuga lasts for 1,728,000 years.

During Krita Yuga, human beings need no shelters. There are no shortage of food. Gift-giving trees provide them with an abundant supply of food, clothing, and decorative objects. Everyone is born good and lives a happy, contented, unselfish, and beautiful life.

People are devoted to meditation, the highest virtue, and spend their lives being loyal to dharma. They work for the pleasure of it, rather than from necessity. Sorrow does not exist.

Treta Yuga

Treta Yuga is the second age in each Maha Yuga.

Treta means three. During this yuga, dharma walks less steadily, on three of its four feet. Virtue and moral perfection still exist, but they have declined by one-fourth. The duration of the age has similarly declined by one-fourth to 1,296,000 years.

Vishnu, the preserver of life on earth, is the presiding god during Treta Yuga.

People are devoted to the pursuit of knowledge, which they consider the highest virtue.

As in Kriti Yuga, the gift-giving trees supply food and clothing to everyone in abundance during the Treta Yuga. But greedy people try to make the trees their private property. When that happens, the special trees disappear, and life on earth becomes difficult for the first time. Heavy rainfall creates rivers. The soil is fertile for the growth of many new kinds of trees. The new trees bear fruit; but as opposed to the gift giving trees, these are ordinary trees. People must work hard to acquire food and clothing. Because of the rain and severe changes in the weather, they also need to construct houses for shelter.

In the Treta Yuga people are more passionate and greedy. They are no longer happy with what they have. Dissatisfaction, resentment, and anger replace satisfaction, peace, and contentment in their hearts. They covet their neighbors’ possessions. The strong take land from the weak in order to possess more food and greater wealth. Many men take the wives of others.

Dvapara Yuga

Dvapara Yuga is the third age in each Maha Yuga.

As the name Dva suggests (Dva means two), eternal dharma now has to balance on two of its four feet, creating a precarious and shifting balance between good and evil. Virtue and moral perfection still exist, but they have declined to one-half of what they were in the Krita Yuga. As a result, the duration of this age is half that of the Krita Yuga (864,000 years).

Vishnu, the preserver of life on earth, is still the presiding god during Dvapara yuga. People devote themselves to sacrifice, which they consider the highest virtue.

In the Dvapara Yuga, disease, misfortune, suffering, and death are part of everyone’s existence. People have become more passionate and greedy, and war is commonplace. Religious doctrines are developed in an attempt to guide human behavior toward dharma, but the gradual process of moral deterioration continues.

Kali Yuga

Kali Yuga is the fourth age in each Maha Yuga. Kali means quarrel and war. This is the dark age. Dharrna has to stand on only one of its four feet, and virtue barely exists. This age is only one-fourth the length of the Krita Yuga (432,000 years).

Vishnu is still the presiding god, in his form of Shiva-Rudra, the destroyer of life on earth.

In the Kali Yuga people achieve noble rank in society based on the amount of money and property they own rather than their moral virtue. The quality of virtue is measured only in terms of material wealth. Sexual passion alone binds husband and wife together in marriage. People become successful in life through a succession of lies, and their only source of enjoyment is sex. They live with continuous fear of hunger, disease, and death.

In the Kali Yuga only the poor are honest, and the only remaining virtue is charity.

Harsh weather and primitive living conditions make them prey to devastating illnesses. One who attains the age of twenty-three is considered very old

Source of this article: 

Hinduism is a collective term applied to the many philosophical and religious traditions native to India. Hinduism has neither a specific moment of origin nor a specific founder. Rather, the tradition understands itself to be timeless, having always existed. Indeed, its collection of sacred texts is known, as a whole, as Sanatana Dharma, “The Eternal Teaching.”
It is thus a complex tradition that encompasses numerous interrelated religious doctrines and practices that have some common characteristics but which lack any unified system of beliefs and practices.
Hinduism encompasses a number of major sects, as well as countless subsects with local or regional variations. On one level, it is possible to view these sects as distinct religious traditions, with often very specific theologies and ritual traditions; on another level, however, they often understand themselves to be different means to reach a common end.
The Hindu worldview is grounded in the doctrines of samsara (the cycle of rebirth) and karma (the universal law of cause and effect), and fundamentally holds that one’s actions (including one’s thoughts) directly determine one’s life, both one’s current life and one’s future lives.
Many, but not all, Hindus hold that the cosmos is populated by numerous deities and spiritual beings — gods and goddesses, or devas — who actively influence the world and who interact with humans.
The tradition is typically divided into four major sects:
-Shaiva (devotees of the god Shiva),
-Vaishnava (devotees of the god Vishnu),
-Shakta (devotees of the goddess),
– Smarta (those who understand the ultimate form of the divine to be abstract and all encompassing, Brahman).
 By Jacob N. Kinnard.
Source: http://www.patheos.com/Library/Hinduism
Hindu cosmology: From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Panchdev worship system of sanatan dharma 
A brief introduction of  Gods and Goddess
AditiAditiAditi
AdityaAdityaAditya
AgastyaAgastyaAgastya
AghasuraAghasuraAghasura
AgniAgniAgni
AindriAindriAindri
AiravanaAiravanaAiravana
AirvataAirvataAirvata
AlakshmiAlakshmiAlakshmi
AmbaAmbaAmba
AmbikaAmbikaAmbika
AnangaAnangaAnanga
AnantaAnantaAnanta
AnataAnataAnata
Anata-SheshaAnata-SheshaAnata-Shesha
AndhakaAndhakaAndhaka
AnjanaAnjanaAnjana
AnjaneyaAnjaneyaAnjaneya
AnnapurnaAnnapurnaAnnapurna
AparnaAparnaAparna
ApsarasApsarasApsaras
ArdraArdraArdra
ArishthaArishthaArishtha
ArishthakaArishthakaArishthaka
ArjunaArjunaArjuna
ArkaArkaArka
ArkasodaraArkasodaraArkasodara
AshvinsAshvinsAshvins
AsuraAsuraAsura
AvatarAvatarAvatar
BalaramaBalaramaBalarama
BalramaBalramaBalrama
Bhagavan-DhanvantariBhagavan-DhanvantariBhagavan-Dhanvantari
BhanuBhanuBhanu
BhaskarBhaskarBhaskar
BhimaBhimaBhima
Bhu-deviBhu-deviBhu-devi
Bhuma-deviBhuma-deviBhuma-devi
Bhumi-deviBhumi-deviBhumi-devi
BibhishanBibhishanBibhishan
BrahmaBrahmaBrahma
BrahminicideBrahminicideBrahminicide
ChitraguptaChitraguptaChitragupta
Chitragupta MaharajChitragupta MaharajChitragupta Maharaj
DaityasDaityasDaityas
DakshaDakshaDaksha
DakshayaniDakshayaniDakshayani
DanavasDanavasDanavas
Danda-DharaDanda-DharaDanda-Dhara
DantavakraDantavakraDantavakra
DanuDanuDanu
DevaDevaDeva
DevakiDevakiDevaki
Deva-PatiDeva-PatiDeva-Pati
Deva-vardhakiDeva-vardhakiDeva-vardhaki
DeviDeviDevi
DhanwantariDhanwantariDhanwantari
DhanvanthariDhanvanthariDhanvanthari
DharmarjaDharmarjaDharmarja
DhartiDhartiDharti
DhermaDhermaDherma
DhraDhraDhra
DhritarashtraDhritarashtraDhritarashtra
DhrithriDhrithriDhrithri
DhumavatiDhumavatiDhumavati
DiggajasDiggajasDiggajas
DikpalaDikpalaDikpala
DitiDitiDiti
DivakarDivakarDivakar
DraupadiDraupadiDraupadi
DurgaDurgaDurga
DurvasaDurvasaDurvasa
DuryodhanaDuryodhanaDuryodhana
Dyaus-PitaDyaus-PitaDyaus-Pita
GajasuraGajasuraGajasura
GanapatiGanapatiGanapati
GandhariGandhariGandhari
GaneshaGaneshaGanesha
GangaGangaGanga
GavampatiGavampatiGavampati
GhatotkachaGhatotkachaGhatotkacha
GrahapatiGrahapatiGrahapati
HanumanHanumanHanuman
HayagrivaHayagrivaHayagriva
HidimbaaHidimbaaHidimbaa
HidimbiHidimbiHidimbi
HiranyakashipuHiranyakashipuHiranyakashipu
HiranyakshaHiranyakshaHiranyaksha
HolikaHolikaHolika
Indra IndraniIndra IndraniIndra Indrani
JamadagniJamadagniJamadagni
JambhaJambhaJambha
JambuJambuJambu
JaraJaraJara
JarasandhaJarasandhaJarasandha
JatasuraJatasuraJatasura
JatayuJatayuJatayu
JayaJayaJaya
JhotingJhotingJhoting
JisnuJisnuJisnu
KabandhaKabandhaKabandha
KaliKaliKali
Kali (2)Kali (2)Kali (2)
KalkiKalkiKalki
KamaKamaKama
KamadevaKamadevaKamadeva
KamaksiKamaksiKamaksi
KamsaKamsaKamsa
KandarpaKandarpaKandarpa
KannapanKannapanKannapan
KarnaKarnaKarna
KarttikeyaKarttikeyaKarttikeya
KharKharKhar
KrishnaKrishnaKrishna
KuberaKuberaKubera
KumbhakarnaKumbhakarnaKumbhakarna
KuntiKuntiKunti
KurmaKurmaKurma
KuveraKuveraKuvera
LakshmiLakshmiLakshmi
LokapalaLokapalaLokapala
LalitaLalitaLalita
MadambaraMadambaraMadambara
MadanaMadanaMadana
MaghavanMaghavanMaghavan
Maha-deviMaha-deviMaha-devi
Maha-lakshmiMaha-lakshmiMaha-lakshmi
MahendraMahendraMahendra
MahishasuraMahishasuraMahishasura
ManasaManasaManasa
ManjushriManjushriManjushri
ManmathaManmathaManmatha
ManosijManosijManosij
MaraMaraMara
MarutsMarutsMaruts
MarutvanMarutvanMarutvan
MatrikasMatrikasMatrikas
MatrsMatrsMatrs
MatsyaMatsyaMatsya
MeruMeruMeru
MitraMitraMitra
MohiniMohiniMohini
MrituMrituMritu
NagamallaNagamallaNagamalla
NagasNagasNagas
NarasimhaNarasimhaNarasimha
NilaNilaNila
NitNitNit
NitiNitiNiti
NurayanaNurayanaNurayana
PandavaPandavaPandava
PandavsPandavsPandavs
PanduPanduPandu
ParvatiParvatiParvati
Peerless archerPeerless archerPeerless archer
PishachasPishachasPishachas
PrajapatiPrajapatiPrajapati
PrasutiPrasutiPrasuti
PitripetiPitripetiPitripeti
PoulomiPoulomiPoulomi
PretaPretaPreta
PrithviPrithviPrithvi
PuchanPuchanPuchan
PulomanPulomanPuloman
PunjikastalaPunjikastalaPunjikastala
PushaPushaPusha
PushanPushanPushan
PushpadhanvaPushpadhanvaPushpadhanva
PushpavānPushpavānPushpavān
PutanaPutanaPutana
RadhaRadhaRadha
RagavrintaRagavrintaRagavrinta
RahuRahuRahu
RamaRamaRama
RamachandraRamachandraRamachandra
RamayanaRamayanaRamayana
RatiRatiRati
RatikāntaRatikāntaRatikānta
RavanRavanRavan
RavanaRavanaRavana
RaviRaviRavi
Rig VedaRig VedaRig Veda
RivannaRivannaRivanna
RudraRudraRudra
RukminiRukminiRukmini
SachiSachiSachi
SadadanaSadadanaSadadana
SagarSagarSagar
SakraSakraSakra
SumeruSumeruSumeru
SamudraSamudraSamudra
ManthanManthanManthan
SangyaSangyaSangya
SanjnaSanjnaSanjna
SaranjaSaranjaSaranja
SaraswatiSaraswatiSaraswati
SatiSatiSati
SavitaSavitaSavita
SesanagaSesanagaSesanaga
ShachiShachiShachi
ShakambariShakambariShakambari
ShaktiShaktiShakti
SheetlaSheetlaSheetla
Sheetla-DeviSheetla-DeviSheetla-Devi
SheshaSheshaShesha
ShishupalaShishupalaShishupala
ShitalaShitalaShitala
Shitala-DeviShitala-DeviShitala-Devi
ShivShivShiv
ShivaShivaShiva
ShoorpanakhaShoorpanakhaShoorpanakha
ShurpanakhaShurpanakhaShurpanakha
SinhikaSinhikaSinhika
SitaSitaSita
SivSivSiv
SivaSivaSiva
SivakaminiSivakaminiSivakamini
SomaSomaSoma
SriSriSri
SujataSujataSujata
SundaSundaSunda
SuryaSuryaSurya
SvargaSvargaSvarga
Svarga-PatiSvarga-PatiSvarga-Pati
TarakaTarakaTaraka
Taraka (2)Taraka (2)Taraka (2)
TilottamaTilottamaTilottama
TripathagaTripathagaTripathaga
TvashtriTvashtriTvashtri
TvastarTvastarTvastar
TvastrTvastrTvastr
UlukaUlukaUluka
UmaUmaUma
UpendraUpendraUpendra
VaikhuntaVaikhuntaVaikhunta
VaishvakarmanVaishvakarmanVaishvakarman
VajriVajriVajri
ValaValaVala
VamanaVamanaVamana
VarahaVarahaVaraha
VarunaVarunaVaruna
VasavaVasavaVasava
VibhishanaVibhishanaVibhishana
VijayaVijayaVijaya
VinayakaVinayakaVinayaka
ViprachittaViprachittaViprachitta
VirupakshaVirupakshaVirupaksha
VishaharaVishaharaVishahara
VishnuVishnuVishnu
VishvakarmanVishvakarmanVishvakarman
VisvakarmaVisvakarmaVisvakarma
VivasvanVivasvanVivasvan
VivasvatVivasvatVivasvat
VivaswataVivaswataVivaswata
Vritra VyasaVritra VyasaVritra Vyasa
YamaYamaYama
Yama DutasYama DutasYama Dutas
YamiYamiYami
YamunaYamunaYamuna
YudhistiraYudhistiraYudhistira

Source: http://www.godslaidbare.com/pantheons/indian/index.php